Maya

automated path substitution in maya.

I’m trying to build a system right now that can automatically substitute environment variables for paths on a per-scene basis. When a user opens a Maya file, I want to parse that file and set temporary environment variables called $SHOW, $SEQ and $SHOT that point to the show’s root folder, the sequence’s folder in that show, or the shot in that sequence. The variable names and paths I’m trying to get are pretty specific to the current pipeline I’m working on, but this essentially lets me use relative paths in Maya but WITHOUT using Maya’s outdated and inflexible workspace system. I don’t want an individual Maya project for every single shot and asset in the entire show, and I don’t want all of my Maya scenes to be forced to live within a single workspace, either.

I’ve solved this problem before by using symbolic links to basically force all of the Maya projects generated for every single shot and asset to link to the same place. This makes for a pretty busy-looking file system, though, and symlinks only work on Unix-based servers (i.e. not Windows). This system I’m building now looks a lot more like Houdini’s global variables… as long as I define $SHOW or $SHOT or whatever, I can path a reference or a texture to $SHOT/assets/whatever.xyz and it doesn’t necessarily have to be within a Maya workspace, and it’s also not an absolute path.

Read more below… (more…)

Maya

Snake rigging in Maya

Last year I worked on a Vikings teaser for King and Country over in Santa Monica. The spot was mostly live-action, but there were a bunch of CG snakes that needed to be added in post, and so I finally got to flex my rigging muscles a little bit.

First, here’s the spot:

Snakes seem like simple problems to solve, since they don’t have shoulders or hips or any other nasty bits that are hard to rig on humans, but the problem lies within the lack of control an animator has over a typical IK spline.

Most simple snake rigs are just that… make an IK spline, cluster the curve, let the animator sort out the rest. Maybe the animator will get lucky and there will be some kind of control hierarchy, but otherwise they’re in for a lot of counter-animating hell. IK splines also suffer from a lack of precision twisting… snakes (especially when you have big piles of them) tend to need to have different twisting rotations along the length of the body, and IK splines can only twist linearly from start to end. Stretching them also typically results in unstable behavior, with the end joint stretching well beyond the intended values, especially when the spline curve is bent quite a bit.

Click below for more details…
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Uncategorized

some non-maya pipeline UI stuff…

I’ve been working for the last few months on a pipeline system for Wolf & Crow here in Los Angeles. My efforts are typically focused on Maya pipelines, which I’ll be documenting later, but I wanted to show off a little something I made that’s usually outside my repertoire… web programming.

The company needed an interface to handle mundane tasks like creating new jobs and assigning job numbers to them, creating new assets, and creating new sequences & shots for projects. Normally this would be as easy as duplicating a template folder, but the pipeline here makes extensive use of symbolic links in order to tie multiple Maya workspaces together in a way that’s as efficient as possible (for example, the “sourceimages” folder of every Maya project in a job can be symlinked to a single “textures” repository). Symlinks can’t be created in Windows, although Windows will happily follow symlinks served from a Linux server. So the bulk of the work has to be done on the server itself via Python or Bash scripts.

Prior to the web app, the standard procedure was to run plink.exe (an SSH command-line utility) inside a Python script using the subprocess module (see my earlier post on subprocess), which would pass a command over to the Linux file server to create all the symlinks. Or you could just SSH into the server using putty.exe and run the command yourself. This was clumsy, though, since you either needed to have Maya open to run the Python script through an interface, or you had to be comfortable enough with SSH and the Linux command line to run these scripts.

Instead, there’s a (sort of) sexy web interface that anyone can run from a browser! Here’s some examples.

Click below to see a whole bunch of code.

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Houdini

Rendering huge Houdini meshes in V-Ray.

I’m working on a production right now that involves sending absolutely enormous animated meshes (6.5 million polygons on average with a changing point count every frame) out of Houdini and into Maya for rendering. Normally it would be best to just render everything directly out of Houdini, but sometimes you don’t have as many Houdini licenses (or artists) as you’d like so you have to make do with what you have.

If the mesh were smaller, or at least not animated, I’d consider using the Alembic format since V-Ray can render it directly as a VRayProxy, but for a mesh this dense animating over a long sequence, the file sizes would be impossibly huge since Alembics can’t be output as sequences. Trying to load an 0.5 TB Alembic over a small file server between 20 machines trying to render the sequence and you can see why Alembic might not be ideal for this kind of situation.

Hit the jump below to see the solution.
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