Houdini

Texturing flowing liquids

One of the bigger challenges with rendering liquids is that it can be difficult to get good UVs on them for texturing. Getting a displacement map on a liquid sim can make all the difference when you need some added detail without grinding out a multimillion-particle simulation. Unfortunately, liquid simulations have the annoying habit of stretching your projected UVs out after just a few seconds of movement, especially in more turbulent flows.

In Houdini smoke and pyro simulations, there’s an option to create a “dual rest field” that acts as an anchor point for texturing so that textures can be somewhat accurately applied to the fluid and they will advect through the velocity field. The trick with dual rest fields is that they will regenerate every N seconds, offset from each other by N/2 seconds. A couple of detail parameters called “rest_ratio” and “rest2_ratio” are created, which are basically just sine waves at opposite phases to each other, used as blending weights between each rest field. When it’s time for the first rest field to regenerate, its blend weight is at zero while the rest2 field is at full strength, and vice versa.

It’s great that these are built into the smoke and pyro solvers, but of course nothing in Houdini can be that easy, so for FLIP simulations we’ll have to do this manually. Rather than dig into the FLIP solver and deal with microsolvers and fields, I’ll do this using SOPs and SOP Solvers in order to simplify things and avoid as many DOPs nightmares as possible.

Here’s the basic approach: Create two point-based UV projections from the most convenient angle (XZ-axis in my case) and call them uv1 and uv2. As point attributes, they’ll automatically be advected through the FLIP solver. Then reproject each UV map at staggered intervals, so that uv2 always reprojects halfway between uv1 reprojections. We’ll also create a detail attribute to act as the rest_ratio which will always be 0 when uv1 is reprojecting, and 1 when uv2 is reprojecting. It all sounds more complicated than it really is. Here goes…

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Maya

creating a UV pass for use in post

A lot of After Effects compositors like to use a plugin to allow texture substitution on objects, called Re:Map. You render out a special color pass from your 3D scene, and then the plugin uses those colors to wrap a flat image onto the object, basically allowing you to re-texture Read more…